Poof Goes the Procrastination: The Prototype Project

As previously stated, I tend to procrastinate assignments. I don’t do this for lack of caring, or because I am lazy. I always seem to want to do too many things and overwhelm myself with ideas, resulting in shut-down-oh-god-which-idea-should-I-do mode. My partner, Elizabeth, seems to really have her s*** together too, which further led to my inner monologue, “holy crap I really need to decide on my project and get started.” I also seemed to really struggle with grasping what we were supposed to do in this assignment. So sorry Alec and Katia for continually bombarding you with questions and concerns about this project.

Image Retrieved from: IndianYouth.net

Image retrieved from: ProJourno

My project idea started to piece together a few weeks ago when I met with my old high school Social Studies teacher, Steve Variyan. I let him know about the project, what my goals were, and some brainstorming ideas I had. My goals for this project were to find a way to engage learners in economics–not an easy task– and relate it to current events.

Initially, I thought my project would focus more on current events than economic concepts. But as I worked on my prototype, I realized it was beginning to take on a different shape. Instead of making current events the main content, I introduce economic concepts in a strange (but hopefully engaging) video. I’m not going to lie; I’ve probably spent close to 30 hours on creating this video in the past week. Half of the video was created using VideoScribe, a program that allows you to make whiteboard videos. I also filmed part of the script to help break up the video; my students were life-savers, acting like crazy people on an island and helping me edit the final cut. Here is a quick look at what kind of video you can expect to see next week:

It’s my goal to get students to connect concepts in the video to Canada’s different economic models, specifically making connections to the Staples Paradigm. It’s difficult to create an online course, where people are going to provide feedback, when you’re not sure if they have knowledge on Canada’s history and economics. This is definitely something I have struggled with when creating my module. I am creating lessons for Unit 2, and usually I would have the ability to build up prior knowledge in the classroom.

Elizabeth and I both struggled to choose a platform, and it seems like we settled on pretty much all of them, hahaha. It was difficult to choose one after learning the benefits of different platforms and how assignments should play to the strength of the platform.  I think we have a nice balance of assessments that help foster digital skills. We both feel like using multiple platforms is possible with a level 30 course, as students usually have more experience using computers. Of course, I am speaking for my situation only, where students have access to Google Apps for Education and 1:1 Chromebooks. I have the ability to scaffold technology use from grade 10 to 12. I know this would not be the case in many school districts.

The main platform we are using is Google Classroom, and I have to agree with Andres when he argues this platform isn’t as aesthetically pleasing as it could be, nor does it allow you to have control over the way information is presented.

“Classroom was a little boring in the way it presents information and modules. There’s little room for customization and it doesn’t really allow you to get “Wild” with anything. I feel like you should be able to just drag things around and place them wherever you want…Google Classroom definitely doesn’t allow for any of that type of maneuverability, which in my opinion is a major flaw.”

Elizabeth and I decided to create two separate Google Classrooms because we ended up doing two different units. It would be really choppy to try and combine our courses, as well as difficult for the people providing feedback to experience what it would actually look like in the classroom.

I had a similar experience to Natalie when she says this assignment has ended up being extremely valuable to her as a teacher. Even though this was very time consuming, I know I will be able to use this in the classroom for many years to come! I forgot how much I loved creating and editing videos, so I’m hoping I can do more of it in the next few months/years!

Looking forward to getting feedback and seeing some other modules that were created!

  • Koskie Out!

 

11 thoughts on “Poof Goes the Procrastination: The Prototype Project

  1. Pingback: LA FIN – S.Tran

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